• franceswalker@thefoodinto

How do I use the Monash Low FODMAP app? Part 1.

Updated: Jun 4


How can you use the Low FODMAP app to make your low FODMAP journey so much easier?


By knowing how the traffic system rating of FODMAPs is used, you can work out which foods can easily become high in FODMAPs and alternatives foods that may be easier to use.


FOOD GUIDE


The food guide gives a traffic light rating to foods, classified into groups such as fruit, vegetables, and Bread (+ cereals + rice + pasta).


Go into the any section (eg Vegetables) and you will see a summary of the veggies classified using the traffic light system: the first dot will classifies the FODMAP status of the food:

  • low in FODMAPs for a normal serve (GREEN DOT)

  • moderate in FODMAPs for a normal serve (ORANGE DOT)

  • or high in FODMAPS (RED DOT)


If the first dot is green

This means that for a normal serve (as per the Australian dietary guidelines), the food is low in FODMAPs.


If the green dot is followed by an orange or red dot means that higher amounts may result in the food becoming moderate or high in FODMAPs- so watch how much you eat in a sitting.


Tap on the vegetable section under the food guide and tap on Beetroot, pickled, and you will see the following:

  1. Fructose: green dot

  2. Lactose: green dot

  3. Mannitol (a polyol): green dot

  4. Sorbitol (a polyol): green dot

  5. GOS (a polysaccharide): green dot

  6. Fructan (a polysaccharide): green dot

All the FODMAP subunits are green and that for a normal serve of pickled beetroot, it is low in FODMAP



Compare this to beetroot, canned and you will see the following (same as above)

  1. Fructose: green dot

  2. Lactose: green dot

  3. Mannitol (a polyol): green dot

  4. Sorbitol (a polyol): green dot

  5. GOS (a polysaccharide): green dot

  6. Fructan (a polysaccharide): green dot


All the FODMAP subunits are green and that a normal serve of canned beetroot (60g, is low in FODMAPs.


…but scroll down and you will see for double a normal serve (120g)- there is an orange dot for fructan so is moderate in FODMAPs. But who would eat 120g of beetroot (1/2 small tin) in one sitting? Not something you really have to worry about!



If the first dot is red

Means that for a normal serve (as per the Australian dietary guidelines) is moderate in FODMAPs. So don't eat a normal serve.


If followed by a green dot- means that at reduced sizes, the food is actually low in FODMAPs. So can eat this serve.


Tap on beetroot and you will see 4 subgroups:

  1. Fructose: green dot

  2. Lactose: green dot

  3. Mannitol (a polyol): green dot

  4. Sorbitol (a polyol): green dot

  5. GOS (a polysaccharide): red dot

  6. Fructan (a polysaccharide): red dot

So for these subgroups: only 2 sub units of FODMAPS are an issue: GOS and FRUCTAN which means that fresh beetroot is classified high FODMAP for a normal serve (75g).



Scroll down.....and you will see that GOS and fructan now have an orange dot for 1/4 a whole so is MODERATE in FODMAPs for this amount



Scroll down again...and you see all the FODMAP sub units are GREEN so ok for only 2 thin slices of fresh beetroot (20g)- not a lot!



These examples of beetroot show that while fresh beetroot is a low high FODMAP for one serve, there are alternatives of pickled or tinned vegetables that are Low FODMAP for a normal serve. Although tinned beetroot can be moderate FODMAPs if a larger dose is consumed- this is unlikely so we don't consider tinned beetroot to have an upper limit that we need to really worry about.


There are some foods that you may be eating, such as sweet potatoes for example, where while it is a low FODMAP food, you can easily eat more than the normal serve, which is only 3/4 cup. Sweet potato fries will easily take you over this and provide you more FODMAPs than your system may like.


You definitely don't need to go weighing each food, just because the app has a weight for all the foods listed. Only some need to be thought about.


As a Dietitian specialising in FODMAPs and other Food Intolerances- I work through your diet and give you easy to use information on which FODMAPs you need to be mindful of and which ones you can really just eat and not worry about amounts.


Tune into PART 2 of this post to find out how else you can maximise the Monash Low FODMAP app.